Section 21: Ljungens camping - Falsterbokanalen

You walk along the south coast on footpaths, sandy beaches and along a living canal. This section is full of wide open spaces, with the heathland at Skanör as the absolute high point. The air space is full of raptors in the autumn, a lagoon teeming with life and a grazed heathland with history carved in the ground. Ancient transport routes, a royal quarters and Iron Age farmers. Horses, kite surfing and sun bathing are a given part of the journey, not forgetting fishing as well. Remember that a large part of the peninsula is a nature reserve with specific regulations to follow.

Beachhiking<br />
                                    Photo: Johan HammarThe moorland of Skanör<br />
                                    Photo: Johan Hammar
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You walk along the south coast on footpaths, sandy beaches and along a living canal. This section is full of wide open spaces, with the heathland at Skanör as the absolute high point. The air space is full of raptors in the autumn, a lagoon teeming with life and a grazed heathland with history carved in the ground. Ancient transport routes, a royal quarters and Iron Age farmers. Horses, kite surfing and sun bathing are a given part of the journey, not forgetting fishing as well. Remember that a large part of the peninsula is a nature reserve with specific regulations to follow.

Nature

Just like the adjacent section across the Falsterbo peninsula, between Foteviken and Ljungen, you are provided with a large portion of sand. The whole peninsula is made up of this material. The surrounding sea is an area where sand is always on the move and that is absolutely teeming with fish.
The peninsula is also an internationally known migrating bird site, where many of the Northern European migrating birds use this area as a springboard for their journey south. On warm autumn days, the air space above Skanör heathland is filled with gliding raptors. They make use of the thermals; the warm air which rises up from the ground, to gain height and then glide on out across the Öresund Strait.
Just to the south you can see Ängsnäset; the birds' promised land. Here there is a lagoon which is surrounded by a long narrow bank and waders such as pied avocet and redshank walk around in the shallow water.
East of the heathland you follow golfing paths past pools where you can stumble across the unusual natterjack toad. On summer evenings you can hear the rasping sound from toads trying to attract a mate. It is forbidden to collect balls during this period, so as to avoid disturbing the toads.
In the eastern part of this section you walk along the beach and at warmer times of the year, you need to rub along with sunbathers and kite surfers.

Cultural History

The sandy peninsula found a place on the world map early on as an important trading location, as far back as the 1100s. The renowned Skåne Market continued up until the 1500s.
As you walk across the heathland at Skanör, you experience how the peninsula looked 150 years ago, when larger areas were common land and filled with grazing animals. In the western part of the heathland, you walk over the small stream called Ammerännan.  In the middle ages, this was a canal where sailing boats could travel; at least those which were flat-bottomed boats.
Just north of the golf course, your curiosity may be aroused by the mysterious place called Skyttsie Hage. Banks and foundations reflect the fact that there was a large settlement here in the middle ages (1200-1350 AD). Was this the temporary quarters of the King; a royal estate? With deer or a hunting ground to amuse themselves? Or was it something completely different? If you delve a little deeper, you can find the remains from even older buildings, from the time just after the birth of Christ. Could this have been the first farm on the peninsula?
Turn off and follow the Falsterbo canal, a popular place for fishing for flat fish. The idea with the canal was to avoid the treacherous banks around the peninsula and the farmers of Skanör started digging it 1896, but soon realised it was too big a job. When the sea outside also became filled with German mines, parliament made a quick decision about the canal and in 1941, the first boat travelled along it. More than 5000 boats passed through the canal, the year after it was built.

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