Section: 20 Hålehall - Örlid

Forest roads and a feared highway lead you up to the top of the ridge. Woodland and pasture extend out as far as the eye can see. Here in the border country, the stories of liberation and loss still survive.

Photo: Jenny Brandt<br />
                                    Photo: Jenny Brandt<br />
                                    Photo: Johan Hammar
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Forest roads and a feared highway lead you up to the top of the ridge. Woodland and pasture extend out as far as the eye can see. Here in the border country, the stories of liberation and loss still survive.

Nature

Along this section you follow footpaths and roads on the southern slope and top of the Hallandsåsen ridge. You go through Hålehall recreation area with ravines and very wet areas. Walk on along forestry roads through plantations and a tarmac road to the top of the ridge.
At Hulrugered you pass pastures and a grazed juniper pasture. Pastures such as this were created when the animals grazed hard and the nutrients were stripped from the soil. On bare patches, juniper seeds germinated and the animals then browsed the junipers so that they did not take over.

Cultural History

You come across several well-preserved remains from crofts along the path through the Hålehall recreation area. Some of them have information signs.
A large part of this section follows Kungsvägen, the old highway over the ridge. The road is called Postridarens Väg (The Post Rider's road) and at Simontorp you walk past the stone called Postrånarstenen (The Post Robber's stone).It was here that the post rider for the Norwegian postal service was robbed of 1680 riksdaler (old Swedish money) and killed.
Just to the north, you pass over the stream called Käglebäcken, which was the border between Denmark and Sweden between 1645 and 1658. It is said that Queen Kristina jumped over the stream and shouted "At last I am free and out of Sweden, to where I hope never to return". This was in 1654 and Kristina had just abdicated.
All of the farms, woodlands and stone walls in the area and within firing distance of the road were raised to the ground in the 1670s. The Swedish king wanted to get rid of the troop of pro-Danish partisans that caused lots of problems and that had made camp on the top of the ridge.

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