Section: 18 Torekov - Vejbystrand

This section runs along footpaths providing easy walking and coastal roads through pastures. Discover a pleasant fishing village, seals and a giant heap of soil. Do not miss Hallands Väderö.

Photo: Jenny Brandt<br />
                                    The coastline at Torekov fishing village.<br />
                                    Photo: Jenny BrandtPhoto: Jenny Brandt<br />
                                    Waterfront<br />
                                    Photo: Magnus Malm
More pictures
Map >

This section runs along footpaths providing easy walking and coastal roads through pastures. Discover a pleasant fishing village, seals and a giant heap of soil. Do not miss Hallands Väderö.

Nature

Along this section, you walk past small, idyllic coastal villages, through flat pastures where there is lots of livestock and stiles.
Coastal roads take you into the fishing village of Torekov. In the centre you can find a small park with a gnarly and rare tree; st lucie cherry. The species is a member of the rose family. Just west of the harbour there is a dark ribbon melted into the red-ish bedrock. This is magma which has forced its way up and created a seam of diabase.
By the shore you can catch crabs and from the harbour at Torekov, there are trips out to the beautiful island of Hallands Väderö.
The route to the south along the coast of Bjäre takes you across juniper pastures where nutrient poor grassland is mixed up with rich meadows. Suddenly wet patches and pools appear where you can find the most numbers of rarities. The adjacent sea is also valuable and harbour seals, porpoises and sometimes also grey seals visit the area.
The bird life is rich with different ducks, gulls and waders. Sometimes Atlantic birds such as northern gannet and black legged kittiwake are blown in. The islands of Inre and Yttre Grytskär are worth an extra special look for example for black guillemot.

Cultural History

Torekov is synonymous with a genuine fishing environment and you walk past buildings from the 1800s and fishing sheds. The sea captain's old bathing house can be found by the harbour. People made their living from fishing and shipping, but farming and brick production were also important industries.
The old medieval church, today a park, was dedicated to St Thora and by the beach you walk past the large boulder called St Thora's stone. The young maiden, named Thora, was the daughter of a Danish king and she floated ashore here.
The ancient monuments along the coast of Bjäre are numerous. Dagshög is one of the almost one thousand burial mounds, and the largest with a diameter of 42 metres.
The pastures were the common grazing land for the villagers (out-fields). Seaweed that floated ashore was important fertiliser for the fields and stone was quarried in several places. Dagshög quarry is the more obvious one along this section. Between 1904 and 1914 stone was shipped to Denmark from here.
Today there is no visible trace of one of Bjäre's most important harbours, Grytehamn. Large quantities of wood and timber were shipped from here to Copenhagen.

Share your experience

blog comments powered by Disqus