Section: 14 Koarp - Brammarp

This section is far from habitation, but has lots of woodland, paths and small roads. Unusual habitats and plants line the Trail. Keep an eye out for elks, beetles and displaying birds..

Nice colors on the Skåneleden Trail<br />
                                    Photo: Jenny BrandtHiking in the fall on the Skaneleden Trail<br />
                                    Photo: Jenny BrandtDjurholmen hiking area<br />
                                    Photo: Johan Hammar
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This section is far from habitation, but has lots of woodland, paths and small roads. Unusual habitats and plants line the Trail. Keep an eye out for elks, beetles and displaying birds..

Nature

Civilisation feels a long way off along this section. You stride out into extensive woodland and wetlands, follow forestry roads and stretches of boardwalk. If you are quiet you have a chance of seeing elk, capercaillie and black grouse.
North west of Koarp, you enter in to the valley of Musikedalen which has been difficult to access for people and has thus been allowed to develop undisturbed. There valley contains lots of decaying tree trunks, which are attractive to sensitive lichens, fungi and beetles.
A little way from the Trail you reach the wetlands of Djurholmamossen, Åstarpemosse and Pennebo with its permanent springs. Djurholmamossen is unique for Skåne and is a part of a recreation area. Åstarpemosse is considered to be one of the most valuable wetlands in the country.
At Högalteknall you pass the highest point in Halland at 226 metres above sea level.
Around Ekered you walk past an interesting landscape. Large trees with wide crowns and decaying wood within. The hollows that are formed are important for creepy crawlies and birds. The flower rich meadow of Ekered can be found a short distance away. If you come in the early summer, the meadow sparkles with yellow globe flowers and heath spotted orchids.

Cultural History

The area around Ekered contains lots of evidence of human activities. Dating from the early middle ages you can find long, narrow strip fields with parallel stone walls. There are also fine ruins from the three farms that were abandoned in the 1940s here. The arable fields and meadows (called in-fields) surrounded the village; Ekered Nature Reserve is one of these meadows. You can see the evidence of the arable fields associated with the village in the spruce woodland, where there are piles of stones still remaining.
Drove roads and parallel stone walls, show where the animals were led past the cultivated areas to the pastures on the "out-fields" rich in woodlands.

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